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Posts tagged ‘teacher pensions’

Your Advocacy Made the Difference This Legislative Session

Thanks to your advocacy we were successful at achieving some of our top priorities this legislative session.

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Retired Teachers Lobby Legislators to Support Teacher Pensions and More

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Members of the CEA-Retired Legislative Advisory Council prepare to meet with their elected officials at Retired Teachers Lobby Day.

In an overwhelming turnout for Retired Teachers Lobby Day, hundreds of former Connecticut educators gathered at the Legislative Office Building this morning to meet with their elected officials about issues critical to public education and the teaching profession. Among the biggest of these are funding teacher pensions and avoiding a proposed cost shift.

 

“We must avoid any shift of the state’s responsibility to fund teacher pensions onto cities and towns,” said CEA-Retired member and legislative co-chair Karen O’Connell—a move she cautions could impact education budgets, and in turn, students and teachers. The Finance, Revenue, and Bonding Committee is expected to vote on the issue by the end of the week.

O’Connell and legislative co-chair Myles Cohen said that Retired Teachers Lobby Day—a joint effort of CEA-Retired, the Association of Retired Teachers of Connecticut (ARTC), and AFT Connecticut—brings longtime educators and legislators face to face to discuss issues ranging from adequate funding of teachers’ retirement and healthcare benefits to the resources necessary to support public education. Read more

CEA Holding Workshops on Pension Issues for Early Career Teachers

CEA Pension Specialist Robyn Kaplan-Cho answers teachers’ questions.

You may be years away from retirement, but it’s never too early to start planning. Come to a free CEA workshop this spring where CEA Retirement Specialist Robyn Kaplan-Cho will provide you with an overview of the Connecticut Teachers’ Retirement System with a particular emphasis on issues of interest to teachers in the early phase of their career (fewer than 15 years of service)—although all CEA members are welcome.

Register today. Read more

Teachers Speak Up, Share Stories With Legislators: Join Them

Teachers have a lot to say on issues from their pensions to classroom safety this legislative session, which is why local associations around Connecticut are meeting with their legislators and making their voices heard.

Hamden Education Association members including President Diane Marinaro, standing at right, had a number of questions for Rep. Mike D’Agostino, Rep. Josh Elliott, Senate President Pro Tempore Martin Looney, and Senator George Logan.

“Politicians make decisions that affect our students and our profession,” says Hamden Education Association Vice President David Abate. “Sitting back and waiting isn’t a solution. I don’t like politics, but for legislators to know what’s going on in our schools they have to hear from teachers.” Read more

Statement from CEA President Jeff Leake on Governor Lamont’s Budget Address

CEA supports sensible ways of assisting the state in its efforts to make up for decades of underfunding teachers’ retirement, including the governor and treasurer’s plan to smooth out the state’s payments to the fund over a longer period of time and lower the investment earning assumption to a more realistic rate. Teachers have consistently paid their fair share into the fund—while the state has not—and teachers had their payments increase nearly 20 percent last year.

However, we oppose any teacher retirement cost shift that transfers millions in costs from the state to our cities and towns, putting additional financial strain on taxpayers and pressure on already tight school budgets. The plan to shift the cost of teacher retirement contributions onto our cities and towns didn’t sit well with Connecticut taxpayers, legislators, and municipalities in 2017—because it placed additional financial burdens on cities and towns and property owners—and it doesn’t sit well with them today. Read more

Actuary Sets Record Straight on Teacher Pensions

Misconceptions abound when it comes to teachers’ pensions, but today, in a presentation to the Pension Sustainability Commission, an actuary clarified that Connecticut teachers’ pension benefits are actually quite modest.

The Connecticut Pension Sustainability Commission is charged with studying “the feasibility of placing state capital assets in a trust and maximizing those assets for the sole benefit of the state pension system.”

John Garrett, principal and consulting actuary at Cavanaugh Macdonald Consulting, shared findings from the March 2018 report of the Connecticut Teachers’ Retirement System Viability Commission.

Garrett compared Connecticut with 11 other state retirement systems that cover pension benefits to teachers who do not receive social security. “Connecticut has a fairly modest benefit when you look at other non-Social Security covered workforces,” he said. Read more

Planning for the Future: Pension Issues for Early Career Teachers

You may be years away from retirement, but it’s never too early to start planning. This workshop provides an overview of the Connecticut Teachers’ Retirement System with a particular emphasis on issues of interest to teachers in the early phase of their career (less than 15 years of service), although all CEA members are welcome.

Come and hear from CEA Retirement Specialist Robyn Kaplan-Cho to gather the information you need to answer the following questions (and more):

    • How does the retirement system work?
    • Can I get retirement credit for other work that I’ve done?
    • What happens if I decide to work part-time or take a leave of absence?
    • What are my options if I decide to leave teaching?
    • How long do I have to work to collect a pension?
    • I have heard that my Social Security benefits may be affected. Is that true?

Click here to register. Read more

Governor Malloy Wrong on Teacher Tax

GovMalloyTone-DeafGovernor Malloy shocked teachers in Connecticut today when he refused to rule out supporting a Teacher Tax. He also misspoke when he said he had not heard from teachers regarding the Teacher Tax. In fact, he has already received more than 2,000 emails from Connecticut Education Association members who said they were against the Teacher Tax and urged him to veto the Republican budget.

Contact Governor Malloy now. Read more

CEA Calls on Legislators to Convene Immediately to Create a Real Bipartisan Budget

Today, Governor Malloy reaffirmed his decision to veto the budget that passed this weekend. CEA agrees that a better bipartisan budget is needed for Connecticut, and is calling on legislators to convene immediately to craft a budget that works for all of us and invests in public education.

In order to move Connecticut forward, a real bipartisan budget must: Read more

Latest on the State Budget

Hartford Capitol SummerThroughout the state budget process, CEA members have been strong advocates. In just the last three days, more than 4,000 emails were sent by CEA members to their representatives and state senators. Here’s what happened at the Capitol Friday and Saturday:

Democrats were expected to pass their budget.

In the State Senate three Democrats—Paul Doyle, Gayle Slossberg, and Joan Hartley—all voted for the Republican budget. As a result, the Republican budget proposal passed by a vote of 21 to 15. Read more