Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘state budget’

CEA, Teachers, Students, Parents, and Municipalities Withdraw Lawsuit

The Connecticut Education Association, the city of Torrington, the towns of Brooklyn, Stratford, and Plainfield, as well as teachers, students, and parents in those municipalities withdrew their lawsuit against the state today. The group was seeking an injunction against the governor’s executive order that cut $557 million in education funding to cities and towns.

“On Tuesday, the governor signed the bipartisan budget into law, ending the draconian education cuts that jeopardized our students’ futures,” said CEA President Sheila Cohen. “With the new budget, millions in education funding will be restored to cities and towns across the state, and a new commission will help secure the equitable distribution of funds in the future.”

Under the executive order, all four municipalities in the lawsuit sustained major cuts. The new budget, however, restores 95 percent of education funding to the majority of cities and towns across the state, including the four municipalities named in the court action. Read more

Statement From CEA President Sheila Cohen on Passage of Bipartisan State Budget

CEA’s fight for a fair budget that invests in public education has ended in the legislature with a bipartisan agreement that does not substantially cut ECS funding or shift the cost...

Read more

CEA to Legislators: Yes, It Is a Teacher Tax

CEA President Sheila Cohen today sent a letter to legislators explaining why teachers oppose the teacher payroll tax in the latest budget proposal.

Some legislators have been telling teachers the increased pension contribution is not a tax. Read the letter below to understand why it is, in fact, a tax—a tax that unfairly targets teachers.

Then click here and contact your legislators.

Dear Legislator,

I am writing to express my appreciation for your work this session under very difficult budgetary circumstances. CEA also appreciates the work that leadership in both parties have invested into the tentative bipartisan budget agreement.

You may question why CEA opposes the increase in the teacher payroll tax from six to seven percent. That is a fair question, and I want to share with you facts about the payroll tax increase so that we are all on the same page. Read more

Teachers Speak Out Against the Teacher Tax

Thousands of teachers are emailing their legislators about the teacher tax in the latest state budget proposal. Please click here and join them.

Then read a statement from CEA President Sheila Cohen and watch why your colleagues say the teacher tax is unfair.

STATEMENT FROM CEA PRESIDENT SHEILA COHEN ON TEACHER TAX

Teachers stand together, unequivocally opposed to a teacher tax. It will not help balance the state budget and can and must be eliminated.

Over the years, the state has not fully funded or paid its share of the teacher retirement plan— which, at 4.56%, is less than what teachers have contributed for decades. It is unfair to punish teachers with an increase in the payroll tax to pay a portion of the state’s share.

Some legislators are saying the increase in the teacher retirement payroll tax is not a tax increase. Of course it is a tax increase! Teachers should not be punished for the state’s mistakes.

Teachers do not receive Social Security and are dependent on their retirement fund. Legislators must keep their promise to teachers, who have fully funded their fair share of teacher retirement for decades.

Tax on Teachers Is Back, Cost Shift Still in Play

Legislative leaders are again trying to craft a state budget, and again trying to balance the budget on the backs of students and teachers.

The teacher tax is once again being considered, along with the plan to shift the cost of teacher retirement contributions onto our cities and towns.

Contact your legislators today.

CEA members must continue to speak out and oppose these harmful proposals.

  • Reject a tax on teachers
  • Reject a cost shift
  • Invest in, don’t cut, public education

 

CEA Goes to Court to Block Education Funding Cuts

CEA joined with Torrington and Plainfield teachers, a Brooklyn parent and her two children, and the municipalities of Torrington, Plainfield, and Brooklyn yesterday to file a lawsuit against cuts to education in the governor’s executive order.

“We have taken this action to prevent our schools from being stripped of critical resources because that will cause irreparable harm to our students,” said CEA President Sheila Cohen. Read more

CEA, Teachers, Students, Parents, and Municipalities Take the State to Court to Prevent $557 Million in Education Funding Cuts

The Connecticut Education Association, the city of Torrington, the towns of Brooklyn and Plainfield, as well as teachers, students, and parents in those municipalities are taking the state to court over the loss of millions in education funding.

Today, the group filed a lawsuit in Hartford Superior Court seeking an injunction against Governor Malloy’s executive order that strips more than $557 million in education funding from the majority of the state’s public schools and puts children’s futures at risk.

“We can’t sit by and watch our public schools dismantled and students and teachers stripped of essential resources,” said CEA President Sheila Cohen. “This injunction is the first step toward ensuring that our state lives up to its commitment and constitutional obligations to adequately fund public education.” Read more

Third Town Joins CEA Injunction Against Implementation of Governor’s Executive Order

The town of Plainfield, as well as teachers and students in the town, have joined the injunction to prevent Governor Malloy from implementing his executive order and cutting $557 million in education funding to cities and towns, jeopardizing the education of students and the resources and financial well-being of the state’s municipalities and their residents.

That brings to three the number of municipalities joining CEA in the suit. Last week CEA announced that Torrington and Brooklyn, as well as teachers and students in those two towns—had signed on to the injunction. All three municipalities rank high in levels of poverty, and the cuts will cause irreparable harm to students, teachers, and public schools. Read more

Statement From CEA President Sheila Cohen on State Budget Veto

With today’s veto of the Republican budget, CEA is calling on legislators to convene immediately to create a real bipartisan budget that works for all of us and invests in public education.

Legislators have another opportunity to move Connecticut forward. A true bipartisan budget must eliminate inefficiencies in state programs and protect critical services; preserve the state’s strengths, including a high-quality education system; institute real tax reform that improves the reliability of the state’s revenue streams in line with the 21st century economy; close tax loopholes and unnecessary tax subsidies; and honor the rights of workers and families.

Legislators should not resurrect schemes that will hurt our students, our teachers, our families, and our communities.

CEA members will continue to oppose proposals that try to balance the budget on the backs of teachers and students. We will advocate for a fair budget that makes Connecticut a great place for families to live, work, and educate their children.

Urge Governor Malloy to Veto Republican Budget With Unprecedented Teacher Tax

Governor Malloy has said he will veto the Republican budget that passed the legislature this weekend, however he is receiving calls and emails from voters who want him to sign that budget into law. We must let him know teachers stand strong in opposition to this budget and urge him to veto the Republican budget.

The Republican budget imposes an unprecedented tax on teachers of approximately $1,500 per teacher—every year—that will NOT go into the teacher pension fund to support teacher retirement. This is an unfair tax that goes into the state’s general fund, and must not become law.

Click here to email Governor Malloy.

Or call his office at (800) 406-1527.
Read more