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Posts tagged ‘sick schools’

Mold, Rodent Droppings, Extreme Temperatures: Connecticut’s Schools Are Falling Apart and Making Students and Teachers Sick

Mold is a serious problem in many Connecticut schools, including this one in Stamford.

Students are vomiting and complaining of headaches and feeling like they are going to pass out.

It’s too hot, it’s like teaching in a pizza oven, and our students are overheating.

Every morning, I find rodent feces in my pre-k classroom where students work and play.

There are high levels of mold in my classroom and in the building, making students and teachers sick.

Sometimes in the winter, it’s warmer outside.

These are just a few of the comments reported by teachers from across the state who responded to a new CEA survey on environmental issues in their schools. The shocking findings highlight the need to address environmental problems in Connecticut’s school buildings that jeopardize the health and safety of students and teachers.

“From Stamford to Manchester and towns in between, teachers have been reporting illnesses related to environmental problems within their schools,” says CEA President Jeff Leake. “There’s black mold, rodent droppings, extreme heat and cold temperatures, dust, asbestos, and other issues that are putting our students and teachers at risk every day.” Read more

CEA Members, Leaders, Staff Testify Before Black and Puerto Rican Caucus

Teachers, CEA leaders, and staff testified yesterday before the Connecticut General Assembly’s Black and Puerto Rican Caucus on issues critical to teachers this legislative session. These issues included school climate, classroom safety, the persistent shortage of ethnic minority educators, and funding for public schools.

CEA members and staff, including CEA Research and Policy Development Specialist Orlando Rodriguez, CEA Vice President Tom Nicholas, Westport educator Faith Sweeney, community organizer Shamare Holmes Bridgeport teacher Tiffany Ladson-Lang, and Stratford teacher Kristen Record shared CEA priorities with the legislature’s Black and Puerto Rican Caucus yesterday.

“It is vitally important that members of the caucus hear from teachers and get a clearer understanding of what’s happening every day in our schools,” says CEA Director of Government Relations Ray Rossomando. “Teachers came from every corner of the state and stayed late into the evening, on a school night, to testify before their elected officials about what matters most to their students, their profession, and the communities where they teach. That has an impact.” Read more