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Posts tagged ‘online learning’

CEA Guidance for At Home Learning

Every teacher must start with this idea. No one knows how long working at home for teachers and students will last but it could extend to the end of the school year, and we do know that the pressures and expectations of this new paradigm can be overwhelming. That’s why it’s more important than ever to stay healthy and rested:

  • Take regular breaks.
  • Make time to exercise.
  • Keep to a regular sleep schedule.
  • Limit distractions when possible (turn off social media notifications, for example).
  • Set daily and weekly goals.
  • Make time to socialize virtually with family and friends.
  • Limit the time when you can be contacted to ensure you have time to recharge, be with family, and prepare for the next day.
  • Access Employee Assistance Program or other mental healthcare options to help meet any unique challenges.

Links and articles:

Education Week—Here’s How to Prevent Burnout During a School Closure

CNN—How to Work from Home Without Losing Your Sanity

Read more

CT Schools to Remain Closed Until at Least April 20

IMG_20200208_070320In a press conference this afternoon Governor Ned Lamont announced that the earliest Connecticut schools will be allowed to re-open is April 20.

To support students who are out of school for an extended time, the governor said that the state is working to get laptops and internet access for more children.

The Partnership for Connecticut has pledged as many as 60,000 laptops to high school students in Alliance Districts, saying the laptops will be prioritized for students in the most need. The Partnership will work with the state Department of Education and school districts to get the computers in students’ hands as soon as possible. Laptops will belong to districts, which will retain ownership once students return to school.

The governor also said that the state is working with internet service providers to expand WiFi access to families who do not currently have internet access.

Little Evidence Digital Learning Improves Education

It’s not news to teachers, but a new study is reinforcing what educators already know: Digital learning is not the panacea some have claimed it to be. A report from the National Education Policy Center (NEPC) has found that digital learning is neither necessarily cheaper nor more effective than more traditional methods of instruction.

Schools are experimenting with many different digital learning initiatives, yet for many programs, there’s little research to indicate whether or not they work. The NEPC study found that the programs most likely to benefit students are blended instruction programs — ones that complement traditional classroom teaching with online components. However, doing blended learning well is more expensive than traditional education.

The report’s author, Noel Enyedy, associate professor of education and information studies at the University of California-Los Angeles, said, “It may be that we need to turn to new ways of conceptualizing the role of technology in the classroom — conceptualizations that do not assume the computer will provide direct instruction to students, but instead will serve to create new opportunities for both learning and teaching.”

Read more from NPR.