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Posts tagged ‘New Teacher Conference’

Jahana Hayes Delivers Inspiring Message at CEA’s New Teacher Conference

“You chose this profession because you wanted to make a difference, and that means standing on the front lines for democracy,” CEA President Jeff Leake told nearly 200 educators gathered for CEA’s 18th annual New Teacher Conference on Saturday. “It means protecting education for the common good; keeping schools safe for our students; fighting discrimination; and resisting political interference into our classrooms while acknowledging that politics affects our work, our livelihood, our communities, and our planet. Because we are on the front lines for democracy, we will always rise to our duty to educate for democracy, stimulate critical thinking, and shape global citizens.”

2016 National Teacher of the Year and Congressional Candidate Jahana Hayes gives the keynote address at CEA’s New Teacher Conference.

Pointing to a “CEA Stronger Together” button he wears every day, Leake added, “This reminds us that our collective voice is so much more powerful than just one voice and that the best way to improve the fate of our students, our profession, and our communities is through the collective action of democratic, independent unions.” Read more

New Teachers in Your Building? Invite them to CEA’s New Teacher Conference, Oct. 20

The first years in a classroom are some of the most exciting and memorable in a teacher’s career—as well as the most challenging.

CEA invites new teachers to gather insights and advice at our annual conference for early-career educators. Participants may choose from 10 timely workshops to help hone their skills—from creating a culturally responsive classroom to managing behavior and acing their evaluation.

The half-day conference is free and includes continental breakfast and lunch.

For more information and to register, click here.

Register for the CEA New Teacher Conference, March 24

Those first years in a classroom are some of the most exciting and memorable in a teacher’s career—as well as the most challenging.

CEA’s annual conference for new teachers is an opportunity for early-career educators to trade insights and advice with one another as well as learn from veteran teachers about everything from managing behavior, administrators, and debt to supporting introverts, struggling readers, and students from diverse backgrounds.

Appropriate for all early-career teachers (through six years’ experience), this year’s conference takes place Saturday, March 24, at the Heritage Hotel and Conference Center in Southbury.

Click here for more information and to register.

Calling All New(er) Teachers!

Save the date! CEA’s New Teacher Conference for educators with six or fewer years in the classroom will be taking place April 1 this year.

The conference includes workshops and networking for early-career teachers, and will give you a better understanding of classroom management techniques, the teacher evaluation process, and your legal rights and responsibilities in and out of the classroom.

Registration information coming soon to www.cea.org.

New Teachers: Conferences Just for You Coming Soon

Teachers are busy and Saturdays are precious, but you can learn a lot and connect with other new teachers in just a few hours at a regional new teacher conference convenient to you.

CEA’s New Teacher Conference has been redesigned this year into four Regional New Teacher Conferences, giving you a variety of dates, locations, and workshops from which to choose.

The cost of the conference is only $20, including a continental breakfast and lunch, and some local associations will reimburse that fee.

All conferences run 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Below are the dates and locations.

  • February 7 – Spa at the Norwich Inn, Norwich
  • February 21 – Trumbull Marriott, Trumbull
  • March 7 – Sheraton Hartford South, Rocky Hill
  • May 2 – Heritage Hotel, Southbury

Click here for the brochure, and click here for more information and to register.

New Teachers Learn Strategies for Success

CEA President Sheila Cohen addresses the 700+ beginning educators who came together last weekend for CEA's New Teacher Conference.

CEA President Sheila Cohen addressed the over 400 beginning educators who came together last weekend for the CEA New Teacher Conference.

More than 400 teachers with one to six years of classroom experience attended the CEA New Teacher Conference at the Mohegan Sun Conference Center on April 6 to get training to help them be the best teachers possible and improve student performance.

CEA President Sheila Cohen welcomed the teachers to the conference and reminded them of the importance of their profession.

“There are those who want to make the P in public schools stand for something else. They are self-proclaimed prophets who want to make profits and privatize our public schools. But we know that the P in public stands for professionals,” she told the educators. “We must reinforce that we are professionals, and that we became teachers to make a difference in the lives of our students.”

Cohen said CEA has always been considered a labor union and a professional association. And in order to facilitate change, we are also a political organization. “We are always advocating on your behalf, protecting your rights and those of your students. Because so much of what we do as teachers is dictated by state mandates we must also be a political organization and share our knowledge and experience with legislators. Policy affecting public education should be made with teachers, not without them,” she said.

New Teacher Conference attendees listen to keynote speaker

New Teacher Conference attendees listened to keynote speaker Dr. Joe Martin who shared his personal story of how teachers changed his life.

CEA is raising public awareness of teachers as professionals in a new CEA TV Ad. Cohen said the teachers in the ad are professionals who devote their lives to helping students learn and grow.

The theme of professionalism was echoed by keynote speaker Dr. Joe Martin. The lifelong educator, author, and motivational speaker ignited the audience with his passion for the teaching profession by sharing his own personal experiences growing up in one of the toughest crime-ridden, drug-infested ghettos in Miami. He spoke about how teachers changed his life and can change the lives of the students in their classrooms.

Martin discussed how to motivate any student, regardless of his or her aptitude. “Instead of telling students directly what to do, we need to offer them assistance and ask, ‘How can I help you?’”

Martin said teachers can become complacent after surviving the first few years of teaching and are at risk of getting into a comfortable teaching rut that stunts their professional growth and development.

Sometimes teachers don’t even know how much of a difference they are making in students’ lives. “Even on their worst days, teachers can be a ray of hope for students and brighten their day,” he said.

Matthew Brunetti, a fourth-grade teacher at Uncas Elementary School in Norwich, agreed. “He was inspirational and got me thinking about more ways to motivate and help my students.”

CEA UniServ Representative Joe Zawawi led one of the x sessions at the New Teacher Conference.

CEA UniServ Representative Joe Zawawi presented one of the nearly two dozen workshops on a wide range of issues at the New Teacher Conference.

Session learning

The conference featured nearly two dozen workshops on a wide range of topics from teaching in a changing Cyberworld to co-teaching and even a session on pension issues for early career teachers.

“The conference was great,” said Amanda Johnson, a first year teacher at Danbury High School. “I will be co-teaching next year and the session on being better together gave me some good tips to take into the classroom.”

Kara Ingalls, who teaches language arts at East Hartford Middle School, says the conference gave her an opportunity to meet with other first year and more experienced teachers to gain valuable insight on the profession. “It’s a great opportunity to speak with other educators and to learn from them. You get to see other new teachers and how they handle situations and it’s very useful,” said Ingalls.

Amanda Peterson has been teaching math at Danbury High School for four years. She’s attended the conference in the past and urges her colleagues to attend. “It’s fantastic,” she said. “The price is right, there are great lectures and sessions, and you learn so much information that helps you in the classroom and prepares you for what’s ahead.”