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Posts tagged ‘education funding’

CEA, Teachers, Students, Parents, and Municipalities Withdraw Lawsuit

The Connecticut Education Association, the city of Torrington, the towns of Brooklyn, Stratford, and Plainfield, as well as teachers, students, and parents in those municipalities withdrew their lawsuit against the state today. The group was seeking an injunction against the governor’s executive order that cut $557 million in education funding to cities and towns.

“On Tuesday, the governor signed the bipartisan budget into law, ending the draconian education cuts that jeopardized our students’ futures,” said CEA President Sheila Cohen. “With the new budget, millions in education funding will be restored to cities and towns across the state, and a new commission will help secure the equitable distribution of funds in the future.”

Under the executive order, all four municipalities in the lawsuit sustained major cuts. The new budget, however, restores 95 percent of education funding to the majority of cities and towns across the state, including the four municipalities named in the court action. Read more

Statement From CEA President Sheila Cohen on Governor Signing Bipartisan Budget into Law

The governor yesterday signed the bipartisan budget into law, ending the draconian education cuts made under his Executive Order. The new budget restores essential ECS funding to cities and towns across the state. Torrington, which was cut by more than $20 million, and 138 other communities whose budgets were drastically cut, will now receive the education funding needed to ensure the continued operation of their schools and the high-quality education of their students. This was a critical step to avoid massive disruption in our schools across the state.

We appreciate that the new budget protects education funding for our students and schools, but we are disappointed that teachers were singled out and penalized with a teacher tax. While the proposed increase in the payroll tax on teachers was reduced from two percent to one percent, the monies collected from this teacher tax will not be used to help strengthen the teacher retirement fund, but will instead be pass-through revenue to the state similar to any other tax.

Our children and their futures should be a priority for every resident in Connecticut, as should their teachers, whose lives are dedicated to providing quality education.

Statement From CEA President Sheila Cohen on Passage of Bipartisan State Budget

CEA’s fight for a fair budget that invests in public education has ended in the legislature with a bipartisan agreement that does not substantially cut ECS funding or shift the cost...

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CEA Goes to Court to Block Education Funding Cuts

CEA joined with Torrington and Plainfield teachers, a Brooklyn parent and her two children, and the municipalities of Torrington, Plainfield, and Brooklyn yesterday to file a lawsuit against cuts to education in the governor’s executive order.

“We have taken this action to prevent our schools from being stripped of critical resources because that will cause irreparable harm to our students,” said CEA President Sheila Cohen. Read more

CEA, Teachers, Students, Parents, and Municipalities Take the State to Court to Prevent $557 Million in Education Funding Cuts

The Connecticut Education Association, the city of Torrington, the towns of Brooklyn and Plainfield, as well as teachers, students, and parents in those municipalities are taking the state to court over the loss of millions in education funding.

Today, the group filed a lawsuit in Hartford Superior Court seeking an injunction against Governor Malloy’s executive order that strips more than $557 million in education funding from the majority of the state’s public schools and puts children’s futures at risk.

“We can’t sit by and watch our public schools dismantled and students and teachers stripped of essential resources,” said CEA President Sheila Cohen. “This injunction is the first step toward ensuring that our state lives up to its commitment and constitutional obligations to adequately fund public education.” Read more

Third Town Joins CEA Injunction Against Implementation of Governor’s Executive Order

The town of Plainfield, as well as teachers and students in the town, have joined the injunction to prevent Governor Malloy from implementing his executive order and cutting $557 million in education funding to cities and towns, jeopardizing the education of students and the resources and financial well-being of the state’s municipalities and their residents.

That brings to three the number of municipalities joining CEA in the suit. Last week CEA announced that Torrington and Brooklyn, as well as teachers and students in those two towns—had signed on to the injunction. All three municipalities rank high in levels of poverty, and the cuts will cause irreparable harm to students, teachers, and public schools. Read more

CEA President Sheila Cohen Statement on CCJEF Appeal

Today’s arguments in the CCJEF v. Rell case, regarding equality in funding and resources for our schools, are more important than ever. The lower court ruling last September—which failed to require full funding for education—has ironically opened the door to destructive state budget proposals that would undermine schools throughout Connecticut, including in numerous high poverty communities. These proposals provide little in new resources for the largest cities, pit other towns and communities against each another, and slash educational funding for the vast majority of towns and schools. This court decision must be overturned so that our children are not punished in a race to the bottom.

The Connecticut Supreme Court could take over a year to decide on an appeal of the CCJEF decision, but that is no excuse for Connecticut lawmakers to wait to act. The future of our state lies with our youngest residents—all of them—and their future depends on receiving a quality public education now. Lawmakers must take action now to invest in our students and public education.

Statement From CEA President Sheila Cohen on State Budget Veto

With today’s veto of the Republican budget, CEA is calling on legislators to convene immediately to create a real bipartisan budget that works for all of us and invests in public education.

Legislators have another opportunity to move Connecticut forward. A true bipartisan budget must eliminate inefficiencies in state programs and protect critical services; preserve the state’s strengths, including a high-quality education system; institute real tax reform that improves the reliability of the state’s revenue streams in line with the 21st century economy; close tax loopholes and unnecessary tax subsidies; and honor the rights of workers and families.

Legislators should not resurrect schemes that will hurt our students, our teachers, our families, and our communities.

CEA members will continue to oppose proposals that try to balance the budget on the backs of teachers and students. We will advocate for a fair budget that makes Connecticut a great place for families to live, work, and educate their children.

CEA Calls on Legislators to Convene Immediately to Create a Real Bipartisan Budget

Today, Governor Malloy reaffirmed his decision to veto the budget that passed this weekend. CEA agrees that a better bipartisan budget is needed for Connecticut, and is calling on legislators to convene immediately to craft a budget that works for all of us and invests in public education.

In order to move Connecticut forward, a real bipartisan budget must: Read more

Latest on the State Budget

Hartford Capitol SummerThroughout the state budget process, CEA members have been strong advocates. In just the last three days, more than 4,000 emails were sent by CEA members to their representatives and state senators. Here’s what happened at the Capitol Friday and Saturday:

Democrats were expected to pass their budget.

In the State Senate three Democrats—Paul Doyle, Gayle Slossberg, and Joan Hartley—all voted for the Republican budget. As a result, the Republican budget proposal passed by a vote of 21 to 15. Read more