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Posts tagged ‘distance learning’

The Etiquette of Video Conferencing: Teacher Shares How to Set Clear Expectations for Secondary Students

Stratford physics teacher Kristen Record after a morning video conference with her AP students.

As learning has moved online in many districts, especially among secondary students, there has been a learning curve for both students and teachers. Video conferencing tools can enhance student-teacher interactions, but only if proper steps are taken to manage security issues and make sure students know how to use the platform appropriately.

Stratford teacher Kristen Record, a physics teacher at Bunnell High School, says she has found video conferencing to be a great teaching tool, given the circumstances, at the high school level. “I get to see my kids’ expressions and have real-time interactions and discussions. It’s also really important for students’ emotional well-being to have time with their class community.”

Video conferencing has been so successful for the 2011 Connecticut Teacher of the Year partly because, before launching into her first online lesson, she made a point to teach students both how to use the platform and the proper etiquette for video conferencing. Read more

CEA Advisor in Your Mailbox This Week

The April CEA Advisor will soon be in your mailbox and is already available online. Get real-time answers about the pandemic’s immediate and longer-term impact on public education, and see the creative, heartfelt, and inspiring ways your colleagues are adapting to new ways of delivering instruction and connecting with their students.

Below is the column by CEA President Jeff Leake, Vice President Tom Nicholas, and Executive Director Donald Williams that appears on page 2 of the Advisor.

Navigating COVID-19: Stronger Together

These are uncertain times. Unprecedented actions are being taken to prevent the greater spread of COVID-19, the coronavirus pandemic, which has caused major disruptions to our lives, our communities, and the world—the likes of which we have never experienced. We are in uncharted territory, with more questions than answers, leaving us all to do our best to mitigate against the effects of the coronavirus. Read more

CEA Guidance for At Home Learning

Every teacher must start with this idea. No one knows how long working at home for teachers and students will last but it could extend to the end of the school year, and we do know that the pressures and expectations of this new paradigm can be overwhelming. That’s why it’s more important than ever to stay healthy and rested:

  • Take regular breaks.
  • Make time to exercise.
  • Keep to a regular sleep schedule.
  • Limit distractions when possible (turn off social media notifications, for example).
  • Set daily and weekly goals.
  • Make time to socialize virtually with family and friends.
  • Limit the time when you can be contacted to ensure you have time to recharge, be with family, and prepare for the next day.
  • Access Employee Assistance Program or other mental healthcare options to help meet any unique challenges.

Links and articles:

Education Week—Here’s How to Prevent Burnout During a School Closure

CNN—How to Work from Home Without Losing Your Sanity

Read more

Commissioner Announces Flexibility, Urges Teachers to Do the Best They Can to Keep Students Learning

State Department of Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona today told CEA leaders that his department is focusing on the big picture: ensuring safety for students and staff and keeping students engaged. He urged teachers to “give it your best effort to serve kids” and provide continuity of education with today’s reality.

In a conference call, the commissioner said his agency will be as flexible as possible when it comes to keeping students engaged, but he said, “Everyone has to be doing something.” Whatever teachers are doing to keep students engaged and learning, interaction between each educator and other individuals must be limited to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Read more