fbpx
Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘community schools’

Teachers Urge Legislators to Support Community Schools, Minority Teacher Recruitment

Community schools, minority teacher recruitment and retention, the opportunity gap, and school literacy were just some of the issues members of the legislature’s Education Committee heard public input on today.

CEA members, leaders, and staff testified on a number of bills, ensuring teachers’ perspective was heard.

Read more

Advocates Speak Up to Save Important Supports Provided by Community Schools

Waiting to testify at the Legislative Office Building on the importance of the CommPACT Collaborative are Fitore Kaci with her daughter Teuta, Heather Greene and her daughter Abigail, Grisell Myers, and Jocelyn Ault.

Community Schools bring together diverse services and resources to strengthen schools and improve outcomes for students. Community Schools in Connecticut have celebrated many important successes but these achievements are in jeopardy due to funding cuts in the governor’s proposed budget.

CEA joined together with teachers, parents, and community engagement experts to speak out recently at a legislative hearing against the governor’s proposed elimination of funding to the CommPACT Community Schools Collaborative. The CommPACT Community Schools Collaborative is dedicated to increasing community and parental involvement and capacity building for schools and districts, facilitating the inclusion of wrap-around services needed to strengthen student outcomes. Read more

Support for Community Schools Threatened in State Budget Proposal

Joselyn Ault

CommPACT’s Family and Community Engagement Specialist Jocelyn Ault and West Side Middle School parent volunteer Heather Greene, with her daughter Abigail, prepare to testify before the Appropriations Committee.

Community Schools in Connecticut have had important successes improving student achievement, enhancing parent-school relationships, and providing much needed community supports in some of our neediest districts. These achievements are all at risk due to a funding cut in the governor’s proposed budget.

Parents, educators, and community engagement experts spoke out yesterday at a hearing of the legislature’s Appropriations Committee against the governor’s proposed elimination of funding to the CommPACT Community Schools Collaborative, highlighting the importance of the program.

“We cannot expect that our classroom teachers can in seven, or even nine hours a day, for 180 or so days, carry all the burden of remediating language barriers, trauma, learning disabilities, food insecurity, lack of sleep, and all of the other areas that impact learning in their classroom. We have to create support systems through our families and caregivers,” Jocelyn Ault, CommPACT’s Family and Community Engagement Specialist, told legislators.
Read more

Education Committee Urged to Support a Community School Model in Connecticut

CEA Executive Director Mark Waxenberg, left, and Senate President Don Williams told the Education Committee that the community schools model focuses existing resources to effectively address community needs.

CEA Executive Director Mark Waxenberg, left, and Senate President Don Williams told the Education Committee that the community schools model focuses existing resources to effectively address community needs.

The Legislature’s Education Committee today heard from a panel of experts on the need for community schools in Connecticut to help improve student achievement, especially in our neediest communities.

Senate President Don Williams, CEA Executive Director Mark Waxenberg, AFT Assistant Director of Education Issues Shital Shah, Latino and Puerto Rican Affairs Commission Executive Director Werner Oyanadel, and NAACP Chairperson Dr. Ben Foster all spoke in support of SB 1002 An Act Concerning Community Schools.

Waxenberg said, “Schools today need to be lighthouses of hope for all members of the community. Thriving community school models show progress because they fully address all the needs of the students, parents, and the community as a whole.”

Sen. Williams supports the community school model as a different and vitally important approach to turning around public schools. “It focuses all the programs we consider extras,” including meal programs, healthcare services, special education, and English as a second language, he said.

“This is a great model that will help us build on reforms created last year,” said Sen. Williams.

Shah, a community school expert from Washington, D.C., said Connecticut’s poverty rate is nearly 15%. “We need to support our most vulnerable students with coordinated partnerships and integrated services for the students, parents, and community,” she said.

The community school model has been proven effective in various communities across the country, including in California, Washington, Cincinnati, Syracuse, and Washington, D.C.

Waxenberg said the program draws upon existing resources and funds in the Network and Alliance Schools, and creates a coordinated effort with the schools and state social service supports.