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Posts tagged ‘aggressive student behavior’

Teachers Share Powerful Stories of Classroom Violence, Diminished Learning with Lawmakers

Connecticut teachers Danielle Fragoso, Jennifer Reynolds, and Cindy Mazzotta prepare to testify before lawmakers about their experience with aggressive student behavior.

At a public hearing of the legislature’s Education Committee today, classroom teachers—along with CEA leaders and staff—gave powerful testimony urging lawmakers to address the crisis of violent student behavior in rural, urban, and suburban schools throughout the state.

They asked their legislators to support a bill—House Bill 7110 An Act Concerning Enhanced Classroom Safety and School Climate—that would require schools to help students exhibiting extreme behaviors, provide increased student supports and teacher training, and address children’s mental health and social-emotional needs.

More than a dozen teachers and CEA staff testified in person at the hearing, while over 100 others submitted written testimony describing behaviors that continually render their classrooms unsafe and inhibit learning for all students. Read more

Pressure from Superintendents May Lead Governor to Veto Aggressive Student Behavior Bill

Governor Malloy is deciding whether to sign or veto Senate Bill 453 An Act Concerning Classroom Safety and Disruptive Behavior, now called Public Act 18-89, and unfortunately, some superintendents are lobbying him to veto it.

The bill helps stem the tide of student assaults by making classrooms safer and providing appropriate supports and interventions to disruptive students.

CEA leadership met with the Governor’s staff to explain the bill, which

  •         Reduces discriminatory discipline
  •         Emphasizes supports and assistance to students in need
  •         Provides special education students with greater protections than currently exist

We need every teacher to reach out to the Governor asking him to sign Public Act 18-89.

CLICK HERE to send a message to Governor Malloy, or call him at (860) 566-4840.

Contact Your Legislators! Urge Them to Pass a Bill to Keep Classrooms Safe

Thanks to hundreds of CEA members who shared their stories about aggressive student behaviors, the legislature’s Education Committee voted Senate Bill 453 out of Committee—meaning the full legislature could have the opportunity to vote on this bill. The bill would help ensure classroom safety and address student assaults.

Please contact your legislators and urge them to pass this bill.

Make sure your elected officials understand the importance of protecting students and teachers from aggressive student behaviors. This bill would help keep teachers safe while requiring that students with behavioral issues receive the support and resources they need.

Contact your legislators today, and tell them to pass SB 453 to ensure schools are safe places to work and learn.

Teachers Share With Legislators Heartfelt Stories of Being Assaulted

CEA UniServ Reps Sue Fulleton and Mike Casey, and Norwich teacher Heidi Kapszukiewicz were some of the CEA members and staff who testified on student assault at a legislative hearing last night.

Although it was after ten o’clock last night by the time the legislature’s Education Committee heard public testimony on a bill to help ensure classroom safety and address student assaults, CEA members and staff made sure they were present to testify so that legislators could hear their stories.

“I am here today to tell you that there is a crisis in many schools across Connecticut related to student and teacher safety. And although it might seem incredulous, the majority of the most serious safety issues are occurring in elementary classrooms, including in pre-kindergarten,” CEA Program Development Specialist Robyn Kaplan-Cho told legislators.

With increasing frequency, teachers are reporting being assaulted by students in their classrooms. From being kicked, bitten, and knocked down to having chairs and books thrown at them, teachers are dealing with a sharp rise in aggressive student behavior that impacts not only educators, but also students. Read more