Skip to content

Educator Certification Shortage Areas for 2018-19

If you’re working under an endorsement that is considered a shortage area you may be eligible for benefits such as loan forgiveness and mortgage assistance.

Based on a survey done in the fall, the State Department of Education every year releases the Certification Shortage Areas for the coming year. All of the shortage areas for 2018-19 remain the same as in 2017-18.

The designated shortage areas for 2018-19 are as follows: Read more

Legislators Fail Students and Teachers on Classroom Safety, Supports for At-Risk Students

Fail to override (002)

Legislators failed to protect students and teachers—and lost the best chance Connecticut has had to increase classroom safety for all students and reduce discriminatory discipline for students of color and special education students—when they failed today to override Governor Malloy’s veto of the classroom safety bill.

“It is truly disheartening that legislators and the governor denied protections for the safety of students and teachers, and proactive supports to help students who cause physical injury to others,” said CEA President Sheila Cohen. “The only way to end the school-to-prison pipeline is to take actions that hold administrators accountable for ensuring that students receive the resources they need. We are disappointed that legislators, who passed this bill with overwhelming bipartisan support, failed to override the governor’s veto and enact this bill into law.”

Read more

Heartless Assault on Immigrants Must Stop

The following op-ed by CEA President Sheila Cohen was published by CTNewsJunkie today.

Border crisis FBWe’ve all seen the heartbreaking scenes of parents being arrested along our country’s southern border as their sobbing and traumatized children are stripped from their mothers’ protective arms and taken away by border patrol agents. These children were sent to detention facilities that look like prisons, complete with chain-link fencing and locked gates.

Aptly described as “government-sanctioned child abuse,” these actions cause severe, irreparable harm to children. This is not a political issue. This is a moral crisis. This is cruel and inhumane treatment. This is not the America I know—the land of the free and the home of the brave. This undermines the values of our diverse and welcoming nation. It destroys the fabric of our democracy and tarnishes our nation’s legacy of freedom and justice for all. Read more

Tips to Get Through the Summer Without a Paycheck

It’s no surprise that many educators don’t have regular income over the summer. And while careful planning and part-time work can help manage the summer-budget blues, there are times when you simply have to make those dollars stretch a bit further.

Don’t ignore a financial crunch hoping that somehow everything will work out okay. Plan it out now and you’ll save stress and worry—and hopefully come out ahead!

Start with these 10 tips from NEA Member Benefits to have a fabulous summer even on a tight budget. Read more

Path Academy Charter School Given One Week to Address Serious Problems—Or Lose Charter

The deeply troubled Path Academy has been given a week to propose a solution to the multitude of problems plaguing the charter school and its operators, according to yesterday’s decision by the State Board of Education.

path academy

Path Academy charter school in Windham faces revocation of its charter unless it can solve problems including chronic student absenteeism and the misuse of millions of public dollars.

The State Board of Education says Path Academy overbilled state taxpayers by nearly $2 million, opened two satellite campuses without approval, and 100 percent of its students are classified as chronically absent.

Path Academy gained access to public education dollars because of its mission to help students with challenging life circumstances. Unfortunately, the school failed both its students and the state.

“This was a breach of public trust and a failure to meet the most basic fiduciary duties that all public schools have: to spend education dollars on their intended purposes and to the benefit of students,” said CEA’s Orlando Rodriguez, testifying at yesterday’s hearing. “This board cannot overlook the egregious lack of accountability at Path Academy by both its administrative staff and board of governance. As for the students at Path Academy, every effort should be made to provide them resources to graduate on time.” Read more

Join Team CEF for the 2018 Eversource Hartford Marathon

Darien teacher Katy Gale running the 2016 Hartford Marathon for Team CEF.

Teachers are in it for the long run and in it for the students. And nowhere is that clearer than in the annual Eversource Hartford Marathon, where teachers run, donate, and volunteer to help children in need.

Join the fun this year and support Team CEF on race day—Saturday, October 13. You don’t have to be a runner to be part of the excitement. Volunteers are needed to staff tents, hand out water, and more, and donations to the Connecticut Education Foundation are always welcome. Read more

Keeping Kids Cool at School

There is a heat advisory for parts of Connecticut this afternoon and, with temperatures forecasted to rise into the 90s, some schools are sending children home early today. For schools without air conditioning, these last, summer-like days present a challenge.

Connecticut state law does not set a maximum temperature for public school buildings. Many children are better off at home on a hot day, but when students don’t have air conditioning in their house or apartment, school can sometimes be the safer option.

If you’re struggling with today’s heat, Education World recommends keeping lights and electronics off when possible. Bring in a fan or two if you can and encourage students to sip water.

The website Peaceful Playgrounds offers information on keeping kids cool in school and on the playground. Read more

Hit the Links for Underprivileged Students

Get into the swing of summer with a charity fundraiser that helps some of those nearest and dearest to your heart: your students!

The 24th annual Hands Across the Green golf tournament—Monday, July 16, 2018, at the Glastonbury Hills Country Club—is the largest fundraiser of the year for CEA’s charitable arm, the Connecticut Education Foundation (CEF). All proceeds support the Children’s Fund, which provides essentials such as clothes, eyeglasses, medicine, and school supplies for children in need.

Every school district, even in the most affluent community, has students who lack some of the resources they need, and CEF—through events like the annual golf tournament—provides a helping hand. Often, CEF steps in to assist families in an emergency, such as a South Windsor family who lost most of their possessions in a fire last year. Since its inception in 1994, Hands Across the Green has raised nearly $700,000 for children across the state.

Click here for more information about participating in the tournament or donating to CEF.

Read Across America in June!

To ward off the learning loss that many children experience during the summer, sharing books is a great way to launch reading and learning adventures in your own community. Encourage readers of all ages to pull on their reading suits!

For Younger Readers

OVER AND UNDER THE POND by Kate Messner and art by Christopher Silas Neal (Chronicle, 2017)

As a small black boy and his mother paddle across a pond, she describes the plants and animals that inhabit that world in, under, and around the water.

Read, Discuss and Explore:

Warm summer days are ideal for combining reading and outdoor exploration. Take readers Over and Under the Pond and Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt with books by Kate Messner before heading out on your own ecosystem adventure. Provide kids with a notebook to serve as their nature journal where they can sketch and note their outdoor observations, their feelings about nature, and any research they are inspired to undertake about specific plants or animals. Read more

Legislators Need to Hear from You

Thanks to the many teachers who reached out and shared their stories with lawmakers, the House and Senate overwhelmingly passed SB 453, An Act Concerning Classroom Safety and Disruptive Behavior.

Unfortunately, the fight is not over. Governor Malloy has vetoed the bill, based on false information and a misrepresentation of the facts.

Your legislators need to hear from you—especially if they have not heard from you yet. This is our last chance to persuade lawmakers to override the governor’s veto. Without your calls to action, this bill will die, and students will lose the best chance they had to get the help they need before it’s too late.

Help set the record straight. Give your legislators the facts and ask for their support in overriding the governor’s veto.

CLICK HERE to contact your legislators one last time on this important issue.

CLICK HERE to contact legislative leaders.