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Posts from the ‘Teaching Tips’ Category

Talking to Children About Tragedy

The nation woke up this morning to the horrific news of the largest mass shooting in U.S. history during a concert in Las Vegas, Nevada. As the news streams in and images flash across screens, children can’t escape the disturbing scenes. Many will be scared and confused.

Click here for advice from NEA and the National Association of School Psychologists for talking to your students about violence and other national tragedies.

Resources for Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month

San Miguel de Gualdape was the first European settlement in what is now the United States. It was founded in Georgia in 1526, 81 years before Jamestown. St. Augustine, Florida was founded in 1565 and is the oldest city in the United States. Hispanic Americans have been making contributions to life in the U.S. ever since.

Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage month, which takes place September 15 – October 15, with the following lessons, activities, videos, and more.

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This Labor Day, Learn More About the Labor Movement and Unions

The Salt Lake herald. (Salt Lake City [Utah), 03 Sept. 1906. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058130/1906-09-03/ed-1/seq-1/

Labor Day weekend is a great opportunity to enjoy end-of-summer activities and visit with family and friends, but it’s also an important time to remember why unions are so vital.

Below are some Labor Resources to help you and your students learn more about our working men and women.

Background

  • American Labor Studies Center
    This web site offer resources for K-12 teachers, including labor lesson plans, labor songs, labor quotes, timelines, biographies, and more.
  • American Labor Museum
    See a video history of The House on the Green (20 min) (the house that is now the American Labor Museum/Botto House) and the 1913 Paterson Strike.
  • AFL-CIO: Labor History Timeline
    This web page provides an annotated timeline for labor history events from 1607 to 2000.
  • The Triangle Factory Fire – March 25, 1911
    The Triangle Factory Fire is widely considered a pivotal moment in history, leading to the transformation of the labor code of New York State and to the adoption of fire safety measures that served as a model for the whole country. (NEA-compiled resources)
  • The Triangle Factory Fire
    This rich resource provides original text documents, interviews of survivors and witnesses, and photographs and illustrations. From the Kheel Center at Cornell University.
  • NEA: Combatting Negative Views of Unions: A Defense of Labor Studies (PDF icon PDF, 86 KB, 12 pgs.)
    Victor G. Devinatz, professor of labor relations at Illinois State University, talks about the role of unions in promoting social justice, helping to pass employment-related legislation that has benefited unionized workers and nonunion employees, having positive effects on productivity, and unions’ importance in maintaining a healthy democratic society.
  • National Public Radio
    Listen to a working lesson in American history from Jeff Cowie, a professor at Cornell’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, in A Brief History of the Labor Movement. (2006) (audio 5:49 min)
  • United Association for Labor Education
    This site offers numerous resources, including labor education in K-12.

Lesson Ideas

Resources for Responding to Acts of Racism and Hate

Our students will be back in school in a few short weeks and some will have questions and anxiety about what happened in Charlottesville. Here are some resources for responding to incidents of hateful words, actions, and images and making sure your students feel welcome, supported, and valued. Read more

Teaching Tips, Ideas and Strategies to Help You Start the New School Year

Works4Me is a free biweekly e-newsletter from NEA, showcasing practical classroom tips written by the readers themselves. For over 10 years NEA has been gathering great ideas from educators like you.

Here are 21 of the best back-to-school-themed teaching tips gathered over the years. Read more

Calling All Art Teachers!

Fourth graders at Silver Lane School in East Hartford created art work inspired by Claude Monet’s lily pad paintings. It was displayed at CEA Headquarters this past June.

Your students create amazing works of art–why not let a wider audience enjoy them? CEA headquarters in Hartford proudly displays student artwork on a monthly rotating basis, and we invite your school to create our next display.

Our artwork display area is 4′ high by 18′ wide and can easily accommodate 8-10 large works or 15-20 small or medium pieces. If possible, we ask that student artwork be matted, preferably in a color other than white or off-white, which is the background for the display. Read more

Learning about Independence Day

Learn about the people and ideas that influenced the writing and adoption of the Declaration of Independence and how the 4th of July has been celebrated over the years with these lessons, activities, and other resources.

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Watching the Summer Night Sky

Summer is officially here! And what better time to brush up on your stargazing skills and get ready to enjoy humankind’s first TV, the night sky. These lessons, activities, and resources will help you locate and identify celestial objects with equipment as basic as your own eyes.

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Summer Reading: Resources, Book Lists, and Activity Ideas

When it comes to summer, reading may not be the first thing—or even in the top ten things—kids have in mind! But reading can be the ideal summer activity. It’s fun, portable, can involve the whole family, and will help children academically.

These resources can help you put good books into kids’ hands and connect them to vibrant summer learning adventures. Read more

Staying Cool at School

There are still weeks of school left to go in some Connecticut districts and, with temperatures in the mid-90s, some schools sent children home early today. For schools without air conditioning, these last, summer-like days present a challenge.

Connecticut state law does not set a maximum temperature for public school buildings. Many children are better off at home on a hot day, but when students don’t have air conditioning in their house or apartment, school can sometimes be the safer option. Read more