fbpx
Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Politics’ Category

CEA Members, Leaders, Staff Testify Before Black and Puerto Rican Caucus

Teachers, CEA leaders, and staff testified yesterday before the Connecticut General Assembly’s Black and Puerto Rican Caucus on issues critical to teachers this legislative session. These issues included school climate, classroom safety, the persistent shortage of ethnic minority educators, and funding for public schools.

CEA members and staff, including CEA Research and Policy Development Specialist Orlando Rodriguez, CEA Vice President Tom Nicholas, Westport educator Faith Sweeney, community organizer Shamare Holmes Bridgeport teacher Tiffany Ladson-Lang, and Stratford teacher Kristen Record shared CEA priorities with the legislature’s Black and Puerto Rican Caucus yesterday.

“It is vitally important that members of the caucus hear from teachers and get a clearer understanding of what’s happening every day in our schools,” says CEA Director of Government Relations Ray Rossomando. “Teachers came from every corner of the state and stayed late into the evening, on a school night, to testify before their elected officials about what matters most to their students, their profession, and the communities where they teach. That has an impact.” Read more

Crisis in the Classroom: Legislators Need to Hear From You

Many Connecticut children are losing out on learning time when disruptive behavior from another student continually interrupts the school day. Problematic student behavior is a major problem in our schools, but many legislators aren’t aware of what’s happening in your classroom. They need to hear your stories.

On Friday, February 22, the legislature’s Education Committee will be holding a public hearing on legislation that protects students and teachers from dangerous situations in the classroom, and provides support and services for students who act out. Legislators need to hear from you!

Click here to submit written testimony now.

You can submit your story under your own name, or anonymously.

If you are interested in testifying and sharing your story in person with the Education Committee on February 22, please contact myvoice@cea.org.

Disrupted Learning: Oregon Teachers Share Their Stories, and You Can Too

There’s a crisis of disrupted learning not just in Connecticut, but across the U.S., and the Oregon Education Association today released a report on the conditions students and educators are facing in schools.

Some Oregon teachers talked to a local news station about the disruptions they face daily.

Teachers in Connecticut experience many of these same situations, but legislators are unaware of the severity and pervasiveness of the problem.

Share your own story (anonymously if you so choose) to make legislators aware of the need for action to make classrooms safe for all students and teachers.

To arrange for a teacher-legislator get-together in your district, contact your local association president and CEA’s Chris Donovan or Robyn Kaplan-Cho.

Lamont: ‘We Have the Greatest Teachers in the World’

During his State of the State Address kicking off the 2019 legislative session today Governor Ned Lamont received a standing ovation when he praised teachers.

“We have the greatest teachers in the world,” Lamont said. “We ought to tell them that. Thank you for what you do, teachers.”

Read more

2019 Legislative Session: What to Watch

January 9 marked the inauguration of a new governor and the beginning of the 2019 session of the Connecticut General Assembly. It’s likely to be a busy session with many issues for legislators to tackle over these next months.

CEA will be working closely with newly elected and appointed officials on legislation critical to you and your profession.

Subscribe to BlogCEA for updates and CEA Action Alerts on key CEA priorities this session. Read more

CEA and Education Stakeholders Well Represented on Governor-Elect’s Policy Committees

A standing-room only crowd of nearly 500 people gathered this morning at Eastern Connecticut State University, eager to help shape the future of their state.

Governor-elect Ned Lamont addresses the nearly 500 people gathered for a policy summit at Eastern Connecticut State University today.

“Look at this crowd. You believe in the state of Connecticut,” Governor-elect Ned Lamont told the people assembled, many of whom are serving on 15 transition policy committees for his administration, which met for the first time today.
Read more

Treasurer Details State’s History of Underfunding Teacher Retirement

As it decides what recommendations to make toward putting Connecticut’s pension funds on more secure footing, the state’s Pension Sustainability Commission today heard from State Treasurer Denise Nappier about the history of funding for the teachers’ retirement fund, the largest pension fund overseen by the treasury.

State Treasurer Denise Nappier and staff for the Office of the State Treasurer presented to the state’s Pension Sustainability Commission today.

“We must ensure the sustainability of the fund so that it can provide the retirement benefits we have promised to our retired and current teachers,” Nappier said. “They deserve no less.” Read more

Pro-Education Candidates Sweep Connecticut’s Midterms

Thanks in large part to teachers who were determined to make their voices heard and their votes matter, pro-education candidates chalked up significant victories in yesterday’s midterm elections.

Major wins were scored in the state senate and house as well as in a close gubernatorial race, where education advocate Ned Lamont defeated a challenger whose agenda favored privatization of schools, caps on teacher salaries, anti-union initiatives, and an unrealistic economic plan that threatened to decimate school budgets.

“Teachers made a decisive contribution to these positive outcomes—because they were engaged and informed,” said CEA President Jeff Leake. Read more

Hayes Is in the House

“This history teacher is making history,” 2016 National Teacher of the Year Jahana Hayes told her supporters at a victory celebration in Waterbury last night. “I am honored to be your next congresswoman.”

Five months after announcing her candidacy, former Waterbury teacher Jahana Hayes won her bid for Connecticut’s Fifth Congressional District seat—defeating opponent Manny Santos by a margin of 148,000 to 116,000 votes. She will be the first African American woman to represent Connecticut in Congress.

“Your vote is your voice, and you used your vote and you used your voice to vote for me,” Hayes said, thanking supporters. “We need somebody in Congress who is us, who understands us, who understands what we’re going through.” Read more

Remember to Flip Your Ballot Tomorrow!

When Connecticut voters in 23 towns head out to vote tomorrow they’ll find some electoral races missing from the front side of their ballot. That’s because the large number of state and national elections taking place tomorrow has caused some towns to print a two-sided ballot.

Make sure your voice is heard in every race, and flip your ballot.

Want to see what the ballot in your town will look like tomorrow?

Not sure where to go to vote?

Polls will be open 6 a.m. until 8 p.m. tomorrow. If you still need to register to vote, you can do so by going to your town hall tomorrow.

And if you’re still deciding who to vote for, check out where the candidates stand on education issues at cea.org/reportcard.