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Posts from the ‘National Politics’ Category

Pro-Education Candidates Sweep Connecticut’s Midterms

Thanks in large part to teachers who were determined to make their voices heard and their votes matter, pro-education candidates chalked up significant victories in yesterday’s midterm elections.

Major wins were scored in the state senate and house as well as in a close gubernatorial race, where education advocate Ned Lamont defeated a challenger whose agenda favored privatization of schools, caps on teacher salaries, anti-union initiatives, and an unrealistic economic plan that threatened to decimate school budgets.

“Teachers made a decisive contribution to these positive outcomes—because they were engaged and informed,” said CEA President Jeff Leake. Read more

Hayes Is in the House

"This history teacher is making history," 2016 National Teacher of the Year Jahana Hayes told her supporters at a victory celebration in Waterbury last night. "I am honored to be your next congresswoman."

Read more

Remember to Flip Your Ballot Tomorrow!

When Connecticut voters in 23 towns head out to vote tomorrow they’ll find some electoral races missing from the front side of their ballot. That’s because the large number of state and national elections taking place tomorrow has caused some towns to print a two-sided ballot.

Make sure your voice is heard in every race, and flip your ballot.

Want to see what the ballot in your town will look like tomorrow?

Not sure where to go to vote?

Polls will be open 6 a.m. until 8 p.m. tomorrow. If you still need to register to vote, you can do so by going to your town hall tomorrow.

And if you’re still deciding who to vote for, check out where the candidates stand on education issues at cea.org/reportcard.

Only 4 Days Until Election Day! Are You Ready?

Election Day is right around the corner. If you’re still deciding who to vote for, check out where the candidates stand on education issues at cea.org/reportcard.

Polls will be open 6 a.m. until 8 p.m. on November 6. If you still need to register to vote, you can go to your town hall on Election Day—just don’t wait until 7:58!

Not sure where to go to vote? You can look up your polling place here.

You can preview exactly what and who will be on your town’s ballet by looking at a sample ballot.

Below, watch CEA Vice President Tom Nicholas and CEA President Jeff Leake explain why it’s so important to vote this Election Day.

Joe Biden Comes to Connecticut, Campaigns for Education Candidates

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Former Vice President Joe Biden hits the campaign trail for Connecticut’s pro-education, pro-union candidates.

In a rousing speech at Hartford Magnet Trinity College Academy in Hartford, where a rally was held this afternoon for gubernatorial hopeful Ned Lamont, former Vice President Joe Biden urged Connecticut voters to cast their ballots for pro-union, pro-education candidates. Read more

NEA, CEA Members and Leaders Support Jahana Hayes

With less than four weeks left until Election Day, dozens of CEA members, staff, and leaders—joined by NEA Vice President Becky Pringle—came out to Danbury this weekend in a show of support for 2016 National Teacher of the Year Jahana Hayes, who is running for office in Connecticut’s Fifth Congressional District.

Congressional candidate Jahana Hayes, a former Waterbury teacher, is championed by NEA Vice President Becky Pringle and CEA President Jeff Leake.

“Everything is at stake,” Hayes told the crowd, referring to mounting threats to public education and teachers’ rights to bargain for fair wages and working conditions. “I represent a lot of people—the voices of a lot of people—who are saying, ‘No, we will not accept this. No, this is not O.K. This has to change, and we will not be forgotten.’ And there’s so much responsibility in that.”

Pringle, a middle school science teacher with 31 years of classroom experience, captured the current education struggle with the words of W.E.B. Dubois, who said, “The freedom to learn has been bought by bitter sacrifice. So whatever you might think about the curtailment of other civil rights, you must fight to the last ditch to keep open the right to learn.” Read more

It’s National Voter Registration Day—Are You Registered?

Millions of Americans miss out on the opportunity to vote every year because they don’t meet deadlines or don’t know how to register. National Voter Registration Day attempts to right this wrong and make sure every person who is eligible to vote and wants to do so is registered.

National Voter Registration Day is a nonpartisan effort focused on our right as citizens to vote and have our voices heard. If you aren’t registered, or you know someone who isn’t, please check out the information below.

How to register to vote in Connecticut

You can register to vote online if you have a current and valid driver’s license, learner’s permit, or non-driver photo identification card issued by the CT Department of Motor Vehicles.

You can use the online system to (1) register to vote in Connecticut, (2) change your name and/or address if you’ve moved within a town, or (3) enroll in a political party or change party enrollment (changing parties may result in losing rights in all parties for three months).

If you move, you must re-register to vote in person in your new town of residence. Read more

Heartless Assault on Immigrants Must Stop

The following op-ed by CEA President Sheila Cohen was published by CTNewsJunkie today.

Border crisis FBWe’ve all seen the heartbreaking scenes of parents being arrested along our country’s southern border as their sobbing and traumatized children are stripped from their mothers’ protective arms and taken away by border patrol agents. These children were sent to detention facilities that look like prisons, complete with chain-link fencing and locked gates.

Aptly described as “government-sanctioned child abuse,” these actions cause severe, irreparable harm to children. This is not a political issue. This is a moral crisis. This is cruel and inhumane treatment. This is not the America I know—the land of the free and the home of the brave. This undermines the values of our diverse and welcoming nation. It destroys the fabric of our democracy and tarnishes our nation’s legacy of freedom and justice for all. Read more

Teachers Join Senator Blumenthal in Opposition to GOP Tax Plan

Senator Blumenthal, teacher and State Rep. Joshua Hall, and West Hartford teacher Theresa McKeown spoke out against the proposal to eliminate the educator expense deduction at a press conference today at West Middle School in Hartford.

When West Hartford teacher and local Association president Theresa McKeown heard that the Republican tax plan would eliminate the popular educator expense deduction she wanted to find out what this would mean for her colleagues.

Most teachers told her they spend $500 to $1,000 annually out-of-pocket on supplies for their classrooms—considerably above the $250 the federal government currently allows teachers to deduct from their taxes.

And what do teachers spend that money on? The list McKeown compiled is long and includes winter coats, hats, mittens, boots, calculators, binders, magazine subscriptions, snacks for students who have none, and meals to send home with students over the weekend. Read more

Supreme Court Strikes Down Gorsuch Ruling on Special Education Funding: Decision Could Impact CCJEF Appeal

Last week, in the midst of a hearing on Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, the justices on that very court issued a unanimous decision that rejected one of Judge Gorsuch’s rulings against students with disabilities, and repudiated his reasoning in the case.

The decision came in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District RE-1 and resolved a conflict among lower courts as to the level of educational benefits a school must provide to students with disabilities covered by the IDEA. Written by Chief Judge Roberts, the decision resoundingly rejected the “merely . . . more than de minimis” Gorsuch standard, holding that a school must offer those students an individualized education program (IEP) that is “reasonably calculated” to enable a student “to make progress appropriate in light of the child’s circumstances.” Read more