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Posts from the ‘Education news’ Category

Join Your Colleagues for a Film Screening and Discussion on How to Combat the School-to-Prison Pipeline

How are attitudes, experiences, and stereotypes impacting young people of color in Connecticut today? Join your fellow CEA members April 25 in Bridgeport for a film screening and an engaging discussion with experts on cultural responsiveness and juvenile justice.

This workshop, sponsored by the CEA Ethnic Minority Affairs Commission, is free to CEA members and will include a viewing of the CPTV film Color of Justice Revisited. It will also feature a discussion with the following guest speakers on how educators can help combat the school-to-prison pipeline.

Register now. Read more

Tell Your Legislators: No Cost Shift

A proposal before the legislature would shift a portion of the state’s teacher pension system costs onto cities and towns. If this plan were to pass, cities and towns would be left with less funding for schools, and teachers’ future salaries and health benefits would be negatively impacted.

Contact your legislators today and urge them to STOP the proposal to shift the state’s responsibility for teacher retirement to our towns.

Under this proposal (Sec. 6 of House Bill 7150), most towns would be responsible for 25 percent of the “normal” retirement costs (i.e. annual retirement costs excluding unfunded liabilities). Towns with higher average pensionable salaries would contribute more, and the 25 least wealthy municipalities would contribute five percent of their associated normal cost.

Click here to see your town. Read more

Governor Wants to Recruit More Teachers of Color

Speaking to hundreds of students at Harding High School in Bridgeport today, Governor Ned Lamont encouraged his audience to pursue a career in teaching and be role models for the next generation of students.

Governor Ned Lamont talked about his bill to recruit more people of color to the teaching profession today at Harding High School in Bridgeport.

“I want to make sure people know teaching is the most valuable profession in the world,” said Lamont. Read more

Institute Offers Sessions by and for Educators on Collaboration, Innovative Practices, and Social Emotional Learning

Participants at last year’s Teacher Leader Institute hear from Peter Gamwell.

How can teacher leaders enable creativity, collaboration, and innovation in their classrooms and beyond? Come to the third annual Teacher Leader Institute May 20 at Central Connecticut State University to find out.

The day will feature three outstanding keynote speakers, Andy Hargreaves (professional collaboration), Peter Gamwell (back by demand on creativity), and Marc Brackett (social/emotional learning). Participants will also be able to choose from among 22 breakout sessions by and for teachers and administrators who will offer multiple perspectives on the role of teachers as leaders and the conditions that support them.

Click here for more information on the event schedule and the breakout sessions offered.

Early-bird registration (on or before April 15) is $60 per person, which includes food and materials. Registration after April 15 is $75 per person.

Register today!

The institute is offered by CCSU in partnership with CEA, AFT-CT, and Duke University TeachHouse.

Hayes Sponsors Legislation Against Arming Teachers

U.S. Congresswoman Jahana Hayes returned to the school in Waterbury where she taught for fifteen years to highlight legislation she has introduced to keep guns out of classrooms.

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Hear How Your Colleagues Are Welcoming Their Students and Celebrating Diversity

“My favorite thing about teaching in a public school is that I get to meet people from all walks of life,” says Bridgeport teacher and 2019 Connecticut Teacher of the Year Sheena Graham.

Why public schools? “Every child deserves an education, and public schools are the best way to provide that education,” says Marlborough teacher David Wasserman.

Graham, Wasserman, and other teachers who took part in a recent CEA TV commercial share why public schools are so important and what learning in a diverse environment offers their students.


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Teachers Urge Legislators to Support Community Schools, Minority Teacher Recruitment

Community schools, minority teacher recruitment and retention, the opportunity gap, and school literacy were just some of the issues members of the legislature’s Education Committee heard public input on today.

CEA members, leaders, and staff testified on a number of bills, ensuring teachers’ perspective was heard.

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Waterbury Teachers Union Stands Together Against Salary Freeze: ‘No More Zero’

Wearing #RedForEd T-shirts, several hundred Waterbury teachers showed their strength as a union, their dedication to their profession, and their value to the community...

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CEA Members, Leaders Support Teaching of African-American and Puerto Rican and Latino Studies

“Our students would only benefit from having more opportunities to learn about the culture, struggles, and contributions of African-Americans and Latinos throughout history,” Waterbury teacher Sean Mosley told the legislature’s Education Committee at a hearing today. He was speaking out on two bills that would ensure the inclusion of African-American as well as Puerto Rican and Latino Studies in school curricula.

Waterbury teacher Sean Mosley, chair of CEA’s Ethnic and Minority Affairs Commission, testified before the Education Committee today.

“CEA wholeheartedly supports House Bills 7082 and 7083 and believes integrating the history and struggles of Blacks, Puerto Ricans, and other Latinos into the state’s required curricula is long overdue,” CEA President Jeff Leake told lawmakers. “The history of these groups is tightly interwoven with U.S. history, but we have not given it the prominence it deserves.” Read more

Co-Building Reps Work Together to Represent Members

Lori Woodruff and Donna Bosworth, building reps at the Academy for International Studies Elementary Magnet School in Danbury.

“Teachers become teachers because we want to help kids,” says Danbury building rep Lori Woodruff. “It’s the same with our union—we are here to help each other. As teachers, when we’re involved with the union we can do more to help one another.”

Woodruff, a fourth grade teacher, shares her building rep responsibilities at Danbury’s Academy for International Studies Elementary Magnet School with art teacher Donna Bosworth—an arrangement the two say serves them and their members well.

“We can finish each other’s sentences,” says Woodruff. “When we have our 10-minute meetings I’m good at pulling people back to the agenda, and Donna’s really good at explaining in-depth items.” Read more