Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Education news’ Category

Teachers Socialize, Discuss Ways to Support Educators and Students of Color 

Until I went to college, I never had a teacher who looked anything like me,” Bridgeport Education Association Vice President Ana Batista, who is Latina, told nearly 60 educators gathered for a fall social hosted jointly by BEA and CEA. 

Her fellow teachers—most of them men and women of color—nodded in understanding.  

Fairfield Spanish teacher Nayla Seara and Waterbury school librarian Charlene Brown share an interest in recognizing and addressing bias.

“It’s important for all of us to get together and become more involved,” Batista said. We need to be active in our teachers association—our professional organization—which is such an advocate for us and for our students.”  Read more

ACES Teacher’s Grant Brings Music to Special Education Students

Music therapy makes a big difference for her students, which is why ACES teacher Jaime Plancon is excited to have some extra funds to purchase instruments thanks to a grant from California Casualty.

Plancon, a music therapist, works at ACES Village School—a school for pre-K through eighth grade students with cognitive, physical, behavioral, language, and medical challenges. She says that music is an important tool to facilitate functional learning for her students.

ACES music therapist Jaime Plancon with ACES Education Association President Bill Jacobs.

Each class at the Village School receives music therapy for 30 minutes once a week, and Plancon also directs a choir for verbal students who are interested in participating and leads a community drum circle once a month.

Because of the population she serves, Plancon says, “I need a lot of adaptive instruments and technology that can enhance the therapy experience.” Read more

Mold, Rodent Droppings, Extreme Temperatures: Connecticut’s Schools Are Falling Apart and Making Students and Teachers Sick

Mold is a serious problem in many Connecticut schools, including this one in Stamford.

Students are vomiting and complaining of headaches and feeling like they are going to pass out.

It’s too hot, it’s like teaching in a pizza oven, and our students are overheating.

Every morning, I find rodent feces in my pre-k classroom where students work and play.

There are high levels of mold in my classroom and in the building, making students and teachers sick.

Sometimes in the winter, it’s warmer outside.

These are just a few of the comments reported by teachers from across the state who responded to a new CEA survey on environmental issues in their schools. The shocking findings highlight the need to address environmental problems in Connecticut’s school buildings that jeopardize the health and safety of students and teachers.

“From Stamford to Manchester and towns in between, teachers have been reporting illnesses related to environmental problems within their schools,” says CEA President Jeff Leake. “There’s black mold, rodent droppings, extreme heat and cold temperatures, dust, asbestos, and other issues that are putting our students and teachers at risk every day.” Read more

Region 16 English Teacher Named Connecticut Teacher of the Year

Woodland High School’s 600-plus students rose to their feet and cheered as beloved teacher Meghan Hatch-Geary was honored in a surprise ceremony announcing Connecticut’s 2020 Teacher of the...

Read more

Connecticut Schools Celebrate Halloween

In ways big and small, many Connecticut schools are celebrating Halloween today. Here are just a few of the fun activities and costumes making it a special day for students.

Read more

Stratford Teachers to Board of Ed: We’re Still Seeing Red

With municipal elections only days away, Stratford teachers sent a clear signal to anyone eyeing a seat on the Board of Education. Their message? We are still seeing red.

Read more

How You Can Help a Child This Holiday Season

It may still be October, but you can act now to help out a child in need this holiday season. By sponsoring a child through the Holiday Bear project, you can brighten the holidays for a child who would otherwise go without gifts this year.

Holiday Bear—a project of the Connecticut Education Foundation (CEF), CEA’s charitable arm—helps make a difference for needy children who have been nominated by their teachers.

Gifts and donations must be received by Monday, December 2, at CEA’s offices in Hartford or at CEA UniServ offices for distribution before the holidays.

Click here for more information, or contact Mary-Pat Soucy at marypats@cea.org.

Chicago Teachers Are Striking for Their Students

The #RedForEd movement is only getting stronger—from Chicago, to Fairplay, CO to Little Rock, to Mendota, IL. Educators and their allies are coming together in communities across the country to create better schools for our children.

Today marks the third day of the Chicago Teachers Union’s strike. Twenty-five thousand teachers and 7,000 support staff have taken to the picket lines to stand strong for a better future for their students. Read more

Education Commissioner Discusses the Changing Needs of Students Today and More

“The needs of students today are much greater than they were 20 years ago,” said Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona during an interview on WNPR’s Where We Live Program this morning. “I don’t think that we’ve done enough to make sure that we’re providing teachers with support and professional learning to meet the demands of the students today.”

From the achievement gap to minority teacher recruitment to social and emotional learning, Cardona spoke on a number of topics. Listen to the complete interview here.

On the changing needs of students today, Cardona said, “Unfortunately, many times when we’re cutting back, and we’re cutting out reading supports, or we’re cutting out social-emotional supports, that’s what the kids need the most. We need to be looking at the staffing that we have and where we’re putting our resources to provide supports, not only for the students in the classroom, but for the teachers that have the difficult job of raising the bar, despite having needier students at times.” Read more