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CEA Calls for a Bold, Realistic Public Education Plan

Sheila Cohen

CEA President Sheila Cohen tells other members of the State Board of Education Five-Year Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee to reject one-size fits all reforms.

It’s time to examine where our public education policy is and to take bold steps to get it where it realistically needs to be.

That was the message CEA President Sheila Cohen delivered to other members of the State Board of Education Five-Year Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee at a meeting at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford yesterday. Cohen was named to the committee of 38 stakeholders earlier this year.

Cohen said, “Test obsession is a clear and present danger. Policymakers are not listening enough to teachers. They are giving short shrift to student creativity, love of learning, and the critical initiative that must be fostered. We need to ask ourselves, ‘Are we providing a well-rounded curriculum that prepares responsible citizens?’”

She told fellow committee members to reject simplistic interpretations and one-size fits all reforms in favor of realistic and robust thinking.

Watch Cohen’s complete comments here or below.

3 Comments
  1. Terry #

    This after agreeing to SEED and tying evaluations to test scores?

    Isn’t the horse out of the barn?

    Can you check in with DVR and get him on the same page please?

    http://bigeducationape.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-nations-largest-teachers-union.html

    October 25, 2013
  2. Gloria Brown #

    Amen! A child is more than a test score. Everything that matters cannot be tested, and everything that can be tested does not matter. We must free our schools and our teachers of the obsession with test scores.

    October 25, 2013
  3. I was on the Capital lawn a couple of years ago when we tried to prevent this SEED legislation. Perhaps we could have prevented it form passing if more people showed. In any event, this is part of the national privatization movement backed by big tech, charter schools and testing companies, and the evaluation system originally came from out of state. Why is the CEA walking on egg-shells around this? SEED will mean even more administrative costs and eventually it can lead to removal of veteran teachers. Lets re-frame this issue and be smart and tough about it, with the best interest of students and taxpayers in mind. Contact through facebook if you want some fresh, bold perspectives.

    November 1, 2013

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